Rabbits and a cat

RABBITS AND A CAT

Fair Queen Attendant Nisa Garcia (center), Brody Holland (left) with his Main Coon cat and Andrew Zuber (right) with one of his market rabbits pose for a photo after the Park County commissioners’ meeting July 11. Garcia is also holding one of Zuber’s rabbits.  Each explained their 4-H projects to the commissioners. All three can be seen at the Park County Fair July 17 through July 21. (Photo courtesy of Barbie Garnett, CSU extension agent)

Rabbits and a cat highlighted the county commissioners’ meeting July 11 where three 4-H members talked about their Park County Fair projects.

Andrew Zuber showed his market rabbits, which are a cross between New Zealand and Rex rabbit breeds. Both breeds are raised for their meat and fur.

Zuber said it took a lot of hard work to raise the babies that must be between six and ten weeks old at the fair, and weigh from three to five pounds.

Zuber said one advantage of market rabbits over beef cattle is rabbits take three months to raise before old enough to sell for meat.

Commissioner Dick Elsner asked what rabbit tasted like and added, “and don’t tell me chicken.”

Zuber said he had not eaten rabbit but his dad could answer that question because he had eaten rabbit as a child.

Each commissioner seemed to enjoy holding and petting Zuber’s rabbits.

Brody Holland showed his Maine Coon cat, that can weigh up to 25 pounds when fully grown. He is now nine months old.

CSU Extension Agent Barbie Garnett said cats were authorized as a 4-H project three years ago, but Holland is the first to have a cat project in Park County 4-H.

Holland talked about how to show his cat, and what is expected for showmanship. He also went through the parts of the cat.

Nisa Garcia, fair queen attendant, invited everyone to the fair and talked about how much she had changed as a person since being in the royalty program, especially her level of confidence.

Garcia said one thing she had learned from Jennifer Adams, fair show director, was that even when she didn’t have her crown on, she still had it on and was seen by others as fair royalty.

Commissioner Mike Brazell said he seen her confidence grow over the past year.

Commissioner Dick Elsner said that the fair royalty also volunteered a lot in the community and served at many events.

Rezonings

Park County commissioners approved three rezonings and postponed one.

Mary Lisa Starry received rezoning from agricultural to agricultural small lot for two parcels she owns on County Road 90, near the summit of Wilkerson Pass.

In 2018, Starry divided a 110.4-acre parcel into the two tracts and named the unplatted division Six Shooter Junction Subdivision.

The commissioners approved rezoning both parcels to Agricultural Small Lot (A-35). Tract One is 73.6 acres and Tract Two, adjacent to CR 90, is 36.8 acres.

The current driveway provides access for both tracts. A driveway easement has been recorded, allowing access through Tract Two to the larger Tract One.

Each tract currently has a cabin, a barn and other outbuildings. Tract Two also contains a studio cabin.

Starry plans to build a house and live full-time on Tract One. Her grown children will use the cabins on Tract Two.

Curtis’s two parcels rezoned

Mary L. Curtis received two rezonings for a 20-acre parcel and a 188-acre parcel.

Both lots are west of Guffey along Colorado Highway 9, and about two and one half miles north of CR 102.

The larger parcel is adjacent to the east side of Highway 9. It was rezoned to agricultural from residential estate, also called R-20.  

Currant Creek runs north to south through the west side of the property. It also contains wetlands plus a 100-year floodplain, and areas of possible geologic hazard. The east side of the parcel has slopes over 25 percent grade.

Curtis bought three adjacent parcels in 2005. She recently consolidated them into one parcel in order to obtain the agricultural zoning.

Curtis said she plans to continue leasing out the property for grazing and hunting.

Adjacent neighbor Roberta Smith had several questions regarding possible future uses and the effect of beaver dams on the Smiths’ water rights.

Elsner said she should talk to the water commissioner, but it was his understanding that beaver dams are allowed under Colorado water law and not considered as a taking from downstream water rights owners.

The 20-acre parcel was rezoned from residential to residential estate. It is west of Highway 9 in Pike Trail Ranches subdivision on Chipmunk Circle.

Curtis has lived there since 2004. With the rezoning to residential estate, she can have a horse and chickens.

Hold harmless agreement

The Town of Fairplay received a release and hold harmless agreement for the annual burro race on July 28 during Burro Days.

According to the staff report, the race has been run for 71 years.

The 29-mile-roundtrip race begins on Front Street by the Hand Hotel, goes through South Park City and on Highway 9 to CR 12, just south of Alma.

From CR 12, the race runs up CR 696 to the summit of Mosquito Pass. Burros and racers run back down CR 12 and return to Fairplay.

A shorter race is also run along the same route but is about half the length.

Vouchers

Vouchers were approved for $370,488.

Commissioner Dick Elsner said $245,683 from the fleet fund was the first payment on three road graders purchased last week.

The general fund spent $90,242. Next highest was the public works fund with $12,518 in expenditures.

The grant fund spent $8,693, and the sales tax fund spent $5,939 and the conservation trust fund spent $42.

The remaining $7,372 was spent by human services fund.

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